No Link Between Vaccines and Autism

CNN.com

CNN.com

It is no secret that an ongoing, much-debated topic among the autism community – and certainly even beyond – is if vaccinations, particularly the MMR vaccine, could be a cause of autism. Although there is no fully confirmed cause(s) of autism at this time, the idea that vaccines could be linked came from a study published by Dr. Andrew Wakefield in 1998– and that study has since been debunked. But it started a movement – there have been some people that look back and may feel like it could have been a vaccine that caused their child’s autism because the timing of the vaccine with the show of symptoms – and those that are now opting out of getting their child vaccinated as a “preventative” measure.

Although the medical community has been working to spread reassurance that vaccines are safe, it still hasn’t done too much to change the minds of those opposed to them. But a new report led by the University of Sydney may give some comfort about vaccines – it reviewed available data from around the world and found that there is no link between vaccination and the development of autism.

As noted in this article, the paper’s senior author, Associate Professor Guy Eslick, said he was inspired to look into the issue after watching some documentaries on the medical debate. His study examined seven sets of data involving more than 1.25 million children and concluded that there was no evidence to support a relationship between common vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough and the development of autism.

This type of research is very important given that, as Eslick points out, there have been 11 measles outbreaks in the U.S. since 2000, and New South Wales/Australia also saw a spike in measles infections throughout the year in 2012.

Everyone needs to make the decisions that they feel is best for them/their families, but this report may at least provide some peace of mind.

 

Lynsey, Community Manager

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