Autism Logistics

autismtreatmentcenter.org

autismtreatmentcenter.org

Being a parent is truly a gift, but I don’t think anyone will argue that the role doesn’t come with challenges. And parenting a child with autism sometimes comes with its own unique set of challenges. They might come in the form of, for example, extended tantrums, toilet training difficulties, hitting, trouble going to bed and/or getting up in the morning, and not willing to eat or try new foods.

To help parents deal with many daily challenges they often face, Kate Wilde, director of The Son-Rise Program, has written a new book called Autism Logistics. Kate has worked at The Autism Treatment Center of America for 20+ years, has worked one-on-one with more than 1500 children, and now, through her book, she is sharing guidance and easy to understand techniques.

If you’re familiar with Kyle’s Treehouse, you may already know that The Son-Rise Program was the treatment Jen and Jeff Westphal pursued for Kyle. It’s a home-based option that is designed to help children dramatically improve in all areas of learning, development, communication and skill development – in a fun and loving manner.

So if you’re looking for help on:

  • How to toilet train without pushing or pressure
  • Introducing new foods without a fight
  • What to do when your child tantrums, hits and bites
  • How to introduce tooth brushing, hair cutting and getting dressed in an enjoyable way

(and the list continues)

then you may want to check out Autism Logistics.

And visit The Autism Treatment Center of America for more information about The Son-Rise Program. They’ve got some amazing stories, perspective and instructional videos you can access.

Lynsey, Community Manager

 

Broccoli Compound = Autism Treatment?

broccoli

Apparently so! A new study is showing that a compound extracted from broccoli sprouts may improve some social and behavioral issues that can impact children with autism. Specifically, it’s a compound called sulforaphane and it’s found in broccoli and some other veggies.

So, you may be wondering, how would this broccoli compound help? It’s related (as described here) to a phenomenon known as the ‘fever effect’ seen is some autistic children – where issues such as repetitive behaviors temporarily fade when a child has a fever.  This improvement could stem from that fact that a fever triggers a heat-shock response that impacts those behaviors – - and this sulforaphane has been found to trigger such a heat-shock response.

Keep in mind that this preliminary study was small and brief – and everyone in the study didn’t respond to the treatment (in fact, about 1/3 didn’t have a positive response). But it’s something new to look at – and it has promise – and we should expect that it will be studied further.

Check out more on this study here.

Lynsey, Community Manager

Son-Rise Success Story

We wanted to share yet another amazing story coming from the Son-Rise Program (which, you may know, is the treatment program that Kyle took part in).

The comparative photos below can speak for themselves, but Riley’s mom, Tania, shared how the Son-Rise program has impacted her son’s life.

Riley at 18 months old

Riley at 18 months old

Riley 3 years old - after Son Rise

Riley 3 years old – after Son Rise

Tania took part in the Son-Rise Program, New Frontiers, and she shared that after applying the techniques taught to her, Riley went from running in circles covering his ears at a playground to a child that is now enjoying a social life! You can read more from Tania, and other families, on the Son-Rise / Autism Treatment Center of America Facebook page.

Or, visit the Autism Treatment Center of America website. 

Lynsey, Community Manager